Stop Pushing

by Kelley Robertson, www.fearless-selling.ca

A few weeks ago a participant in a sales training workshop I recently conducted asked, “How do I convince someone to buy from me?”

This is the same as asking, “How can I force someone to buy from me?

You can’t force or push someone into buying your product or service.

Actually, I take that back.

You CAN coerce people into making a buying decision but it tends to happen more in a B2C setting (think time-share) {{{{shudder}}} than a B2B situation although I have encountered situations where someone made a business purchase because the sales person was aggressive, pushy, and forceful.

BTW: If you need to resort to using this type of approach I suggest you find another way to earn a living. Just saying…

I have always believed that you shouldn’t have to convince someone to buy your product, service or offering. If you have been effective in asking high-value questions to determine the other person’s buying criteria, motives, needs and wants; presented your offering in a manner that resonates with your prospect and properly addressed their concerns and possible objections, you seldom have to convince that person to buy.

However, if you short cut the process and deliver a well-rehearsed pitch without taking the time to adapt that presentation so it addresses the prospect’s key issues and current situation, you will always encounter resistance and reluctance.

And, if you start to push harder when you meet that resistance, the other person will naturally resist even more.

It’s human nature.

When people feel threatened their natural instinct is to defend themselves. And when people feel that a sales person is trying to push, coerce, or convince them to buy, they will become defensive and less inclined to buy from that sales person.

The key is to engage people in a conversation. A natural conversation. A conversation that includes everyone people involved in the buying decision.

Having said all of this, there is a difference between assertively responding to a ‘no’ or ‘not interested’ and aggressively pushing someone into making a decision that they simply do not want to make.

So what do you do when someone obviously has no interest in buying what you are selling? Move on!

Stop pushing and start looking for people who have a need and desire for your product, service and offering.

Kelley Robertson is president of the Robertson Training Group. Kelley is the author of two sales books, Stop, Ask & Listen-Proven Sales Techniques to Turn Browsers into Buyers and The Secrets of Power Selling. Both sales training books provide practical insights to improving your sales results. Visit his website at www.fearless-selling.ca or call him 905 633 7750
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